Forum for Research on the Languages of Scotland and Ulster
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Keynote Speakers

Marina Dossena (University of Bergamo)

“Rooted in Myth? Scotland’s Languages in Nineteenth-Century North-American Journals”

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Marina Dossena is Full Professor of English Language at the University of Bergamo (Italy), where she is head of the MA program in Intercultural Studies in Languages and Literatures until 1 October 2021. Her research centres on Late Modern English, paying special attention to 'language history from below' and to the Scottish context. Currently involved in the compilation of a Corpus of 19th-Century Scottish Correspondence, she co-edits Token: A Journal of English Linguistics and InScriptum: A Journal of Language and Literary Studies. She has been invited to give plenary talks at relevant international conferences, such as ICEHL 15, ESSE 2014, and the 1st International Symposium on Approaches to Dialects in English Literature (1500-1950) (Salamanca). Prof. Dossena has participated in the Coruña Corpus projects since 2013, and has been Visiting Professor at the Universities of Innsbruck, Helsinki and Complutense de Madrid.

The abstract for Marina Dossena’s talk is available for download here.

Robert Dunbar (University of Edinburgh)

“Nova Scotian Gaelic Varieties: More than Fossils”

The abstract for Robert Dunbar’s talk is available for download here.

Ole Schützler (Leipzig University)

“The Elusive Butterfly of Scottish Standard English”

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Ole Schützler is professor for varieties of English at Leipzig University. He holds a doctoral and a postdoctoral degree from the University of Bamberg. Generally working within the frameworks of quantitative sociolinguistics/sociophonetics and corpus linguistics, Ole takes a general interest in variation and change in English. More specific research projects include an investigation of accent variation in Scottish Standard English as well as an investigation of formal and functional characteristics of concessive constructions in varieties of English world-wide.

The abstract for Ole Schützler’s talk is available for download here.